Category Archives: Slow Fashion

DIY Summer Kimono

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Hey there! Welcome to my very first sewing tutorial! Please bear with me. I am a designer and a writer but I have yet to put the two together.

Here we have the finished “kimono” top. Let’s use the word kimono lightly because in actuality it won’t be worn like a true kimono but the basics are there. This tutorial is for the brave and the strong! I’m only kidding it’s for the beginner sewer. If you can wield a sewing machine you can make this top. It’s essentially a folded piece of fabric with shortish sleeves cut into it.

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Materials: 1 metre long piece of fabric. The length of your kimono is going to be determined by the width it is sold by. This piece is about 60″ wide and then folded in half. The best fabrics for this design are anything lightweight and flowy. I’m using a lightweight rayon but chiffon, satin and silk are good fabrics for this project too. I am actually thinking about repurposing an old sarong for this design as well.

Tools: –pins
fabric scissors
-sewing machine
-tailor’s chalk
-ruler

Step One: On your cutting table, kitchen table, living room floor (ok not recommended but I’ve been there). Lay out one metre of your chosen fabric. That’s 100cm or if you’re an imperial fan 40″. Fold the piece of fabric in half with the right sides together and the selvage edges at the bottom toward you. This is the hem of your kimono top.

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The above photo with the pin is a good example of what a selvage edge looks like. It’s the sometimes slightly frayed side with the little holes in it. I’ll be writing a post on fabric direction and why it is important soon!

Step 2: Measure down from the folded edge of the fabric 10″ and then square a line into the fabric 6″. Square another line from that point to the hem. Do this on both sides.

I personally like to use tailors chalk to mark my lines on my designs but you can also use a little bar of soap. Anything that washes off (obvi).

There are two ways you can proceed from here.

Step 3: You can cut along the 6″ line you’ve drawn, curving around the underarm and down the side, then pin the two layers together and sew. Or you can pin it and then sew along the line you’ve drawn making sure to curve around the underarm seam and down to the bottom edge. Then cut the fabric out after. Whichever is easier for you. If you are fairly new to sewing I would recommend the later. These types of fabrics are hard to keep stabilized.

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Step 4: Measure from one edge of the sleeve hem to the other and find the centre measurement (should be roughly 20″). Do the same along the hem (should be about 14″).

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Step 5: Cut that centre line through the TOP LAYER ONLY! Do not cut through both layers. This is the front opening for your kimono top.

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Voila! Technically you could be done. If you are a stickler or you just want to sew some more or you would like to properly finish the top, fold and stitch a half inch hem all the way around the bottom and neck opening and around each of the sleeve hems too.

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If you would like to adjust the size of your kimono top you can go wider, pretty much as wide as you like, but it’s tough to go longer. The length of the kimono depends on the width of your original piece of fabric. Different fabrics are sold in different widths by the metre/yard depending on where you buy them.

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If you like this one you can buy it here on my etsy shop!

I tested out a couple of DIY kimono top tutorials before making my own.

http://www.brit.co/diy-kimono-tutorial – this is a simple kimono tutorial with minimal sewing (like this one) and a nice silhouette

http://www.elleapparelblog.com/2013/09/kimono-cool-tutorial – this one is pretty intermediate. There are too many pieces involved for a simple top. It’s more like an oversized shirt but the effect is nice.

 

Denim Shirt Dress

I’ve been loving the denim look I’ve been seeing everywhere lately. Last summer I grabbed a few metres of this lightweight and slightly stretchy denim from the remnant bin at Fabricland and held on to it like a small child clings to a blanket. Just kidding! But I did mull it over for awhile. What was I going to make this pretty heathered fabric into? And voila! Denim shirt dress!

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I added a front patch pocket to give it a little detail. There is white top-stitching around the sleeve hem and pocket too. For the hem of the dress I added a little extra weight by doubling up a separate piece of fabric and binding it onto the hem. And then the white top-stitching again.

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I love the simplicity of this dress and I think it can be accessorized in so many different ways! A great belt some days? and maybe some big jewelry?! Yes please.

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I like the versatility of this dress for being wearable in different seasons. It will layer up nicely in the fall with some tights and a cardi.

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Trapunto – a Punchy Little Sewing Technique

 

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Oh Trapunto! You little devil making a clothing comeback! I’m seeing trapunto stitching on some ready to wear these days and I like it!

I call it a punchy stitch technique because I just love saying the word. It packs a little punch don’t you think? It makes me want to say it with a deep voice, a hard pun and elongated ooooooo. You know? TraPUNtoooooo!

Trapunto is actually a dowdy little quilting technique. I can’t stand it there. I don’t get quilting to be honest with you. A quilting project takes hours and hours of time and the effect is beautiful but you can’t wear it.

You can however wear a trapunto stitched garment. This technique I love. It’s very simple but adds a nice touch to an otherwise plain garment. Most of the trapunto stitching I’ve seen on garments are just straight rows of evenly spaced straight stitch.

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I recently made a copy of a Vera Wang bridesmaids dress for a pregnant gal. It’s this dress below only made in blush pink and designed with a little more room for the baby bump! Pictured above is the belt from that dress.

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Gorgeous dress. And the belt? Trapunto style stitching! It just adds that extra bit of flair to an otherwise simple silhouette.

 

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Trapunto, from the Italian for “to quilt,” is a method of quilting that is also called “stuffed technique.” A puffy, decorative feature, trapunto utilizes at least two layers, the underside of which is slit and padded, producing a raised surface on the quilt.

 

I didn’t stuff the belt or pad it. I simply folded the satin 4 times and stitched 10 even lines through the fabric. The thickness of the layered fabric gave it the little bit of puffiness it needed. Vera Wang may have padded theirs with a thin batting or something which is another option.

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Here’s a Joe Fresh dress I bought last year that has the same sort of stitching around the neck opening.

Two more good examples of trapunto stitching on denim.

Do you have any great examples of trapunto stitching on garments?? I’d love to see them!

Me-Made-May! I’m in!

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‘I, (Heather Case of Herringbone & Heather), sign up as a participant of Me-Made-May ’16. I endeavour to wear something I made each day for the duration of May 2016’ I will also endeavour to make at least one new item of clothing each week during the month.

I’m participating in Me-Made-May this year! I just learned about this fun challenge! Click the pic for the link.

Catherine’s Wedding Dress

Wedding season is on the horizon! I thought I’d share this dress I made last season!

I had the immense pleasure of creating Catherine’s gorgeous and original wedding gown for her special day in August 2015.

Catherine knew she didn’t want to go through the stress of shopping for and trying to fit the dresses available in the shops and decided that having her dress custom made was the way to go.

She knew the style of dress that she wanted, bringing me a photo of a dress from a magazine that had a unique layered skirt with a pointed hem! So fun!

Every woman knows her body and Catherine was no exception! Together we designed her dress to accentuate the parts of her body she loved and downplay the parts she doesn’t so she could feel her most beautiful on her big day. She even added a little extra bling here and there and a family momento – the butterfly broach at centre waist. So pretty.

Here is her beautiful dress!

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In the Navy – a Wool Coat Redux

There are a lot, I mean a lot of wool coats floating through thrift stores. Beautifully designed garments crafted from gorgeous natural fibres like pure virgin wool, cashmere and angora. It breaks my heart to see them hanging there, abandoned and unwanted just because their shoulders are (way) too wide or the lapel crosses too low. In other words they are really great fabric but totally out of date in style. So this year I decided to do something about it.

A few of these amazing specimens are purchased by crafters and sewers alike to turn into repurposed mittens and needle felted projects or shabby chic decor. Those are all awesome ways to make good use of what’s being wasted. I however have vowed to maintain their intended purpose as wool coats by giving them a make-over. Here is coat numero uno.

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This is the before coat (sorry for the poor photo the light was bad).

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This coat was a no brainer to choose for a re-do. Number one there’s lots of it, it’s a big, long coat and the navy colour of the wool stands out on it’s own. As far as design goes though, I was inspired by the moto style of coat. I liked the off-centre zipper and high collar. I think it is a stylish silhouette.

Another reason I was attracted to this coat is that it had a Toronto Heritage label in it. I’m hoping to repurpose mostly made in Canada garments. After some research I have still come up empty handed on what Toronto Heritage clothing was but I thank them for the coat. If anyone can pass on any info. about this company that would be greatly appreciated.

I reattached the original labels and used the original lining to keep as much authenticity intact. And there you have it!

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